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whatever happens

April 2017

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whatever happens

Got this from starwefter:

1. Grab the nearest book.
2. Open the book to page 123.
3. Find the fifth sentence.
4. Post the text of the next 4-7 sentences on your LJ along with these instructions.
5. Don't you dare dig for that "cool" or "intellectual" book in your closet! I know you were thinking about it! Just pick up whatever is closest (unless it's too troublesome to reach and is really heavy. Then go back to step 1).

My nearest book is, of course, a Regency romance, since I'm still in that mode. In this case, it's my favorite Georgette Heyer, The Reluctant Widow. Nicky is trying to talk the heroine out of boarding up a secret passage through which someone has already broken into the house, and says they don't want to scare the man off if he should return the same way:

He smiled engagingly at his fascinated hostess. "Now, do we, Cousin Elinor?"

"Certainly not!" she said, rising nobly to this occasion. "If he should come again, I will offer him refreshment. If only I had thought of it earlier! I do trust my inhospitality may not have given him a distaste of this house!"


*giggle*

Comments

I love Georgette Heyer. I adore Georgette Heyer!

A woman from England told me a few years ago that Heyer's birthday is a big deal in England anymore -- they make it into rather a holiday, and she in beginning to be considered serious literature rather than light reading romance.
I didn't know you loved Heyer! You do know, I'm sure, that she's my inspiration for my Regency romances. She's wonderful. I recently read a very good bio of her, too - but that was also in my LJ, so you probably know that, too. heh
"Eventually, it stops at a peak.

Real populations--like the E. coli cultures in Richard Lenski's lab--climb these adaptive hills. But ultimately, this fitness landscape is only a useful metaphor. Like all metaphors, it has limits."

(From The Tangled Bank: In Introduction to Evolution by Carl Zimmer)
*cracks up* Only you.